4/11: Reading and assignment

Posted in Uncategorized on April 5, 2012 by Jason Lee Oakes

READING: The Blues and the Veil  (recordings to accompany the article: Ruby Smith “Fruit Cakin’ Mama” ; Muddy Waters “Hoochie Coochie Man”)

The 12-Bar Blues

Extras: How to form chords on a piano / How to form chords on a guitar

*****

ASSIGNMENT:  Write a short song using only I, IV, and V chords played in any order. It can be a blues song, a rock song, a ballad, or any other genre. Print out the provided staff paper and give the time signature and key signature, label the chords for each measure above the staff, and write the vocal melody on the staff with the lyrics below (or give the lyrics on a separate sheet of paper–especially if the music repeats with several different stanzas). Finally, title the song and give some indication what genre /musical style(s) would best fit the music you have written.

The song can be as short as 12 bars with multiple stanzas (see 12-bar blues above) or as long as your like.

STAFF PAPER

Here is a good resources for creating and hearing I-IV-V chord patterns (you can use the G, C, and D). Registration is free:  JamStudio.com

Play your melody to the chords here: Virtual Keyboard

*****

Suggestions for lyrics (taken from Lisa Aschmann’s 1000 Songwriting Ideas):

1) Write a song based on an old saying, platitude, homily, of aphorism, e.g., his bark was worse than his bite. There are more fish in the sea. An once of prevention is worth a pound of cure.

2) Write a call-and-response song, where a line is sung and then answered by a group. These are community-based songs, especially prevalent in religious music and African musical traditions. They’re also powerful in establishing solidarity.

3) Console someone who just got rejected by their high school sweetheart, or got bad news from their school principal, mechanic, doctor, banker, lawyer, or neighbor.

4) Ask questions from unlikely viewpoints such as: What do ants think about? What does the man in the moon see? Why does the pot call the kettle black?

5) Write a song a cynic, a misanthrope, a hypochondriac, or a curmudgeon would be proud of if he/she weren’t feeling so poorly.

6) Or, finally, if you really have trouble writing original lyrics, you may borrow a text from another source and set it to a melody.

Advertisements

Reading and Homework: 4/4

Posted in Uncategorized on March 29, 2012 by Jason Lee Oakes

READING–CHAPTER 9: Chords

READING–CHAPTER 10: Chord_Progressions

HOMEWORK–CHAPTER 9:  Exercises 9-1 through 9-5 and 9-7 (pp. 125-126). For an A+, you can perform exercise 9-6 and 9-8 as well.

HOMEWORK–CHAPTER 10: Exercises 10-1 and 10-2, exercises 10-5 through 10-7 (pp. 143-144).

*****

EXTRA: Build your own chords

EXTRA: Rock out to your favorite chord

*****

MELODY: Antonín Dvořák – New World Symphony, 4th movement (piano transcription with notation) (more about the piece)

The development of harmony in the European church music:  Plainchant (monophony) / Organum (Homophony) / Motet (Polyphony)

TEXTURE: Homophony“Mary had a little lamb” vocals in parallel 5ths

Ladysmith Black Mambazo with Paul Simon “Homeless”Homophony (singing in four-part harmony, sometimes with featured melody)

Louis Armstrong and his Hot Seven “Potato head blues” — Polyphonic through the first 40 seconds in a Dixieland jazz style with trumpet and clarinet playing distinct melodies; the trombone playing a more subtle, slow moving melody; and the tuba playing a melody line that, depending on how hear it, could be considered more of a harmony part with the chords broken up into a single line with occasional passing tones (non-chord tones) thrown in. After 0:40, the  texture shifts to homophonic with featured melodic soloists playing melodies against a banjo and piano? chordal backdrop. And then at 2:32 you have a return to the polyphonic texture. (more about “Potato Head Blues” and how it makes life worth living according to Woody Allen)

Herbie Hancock “Watermelon Man” — a jazz fusion landmark, the first 1:45 borrows from Central African traditional music, building a polyphonic texture out of various interlocking parts. (an editorial on this musical borrowing) (more about the composition, a jazz standard recorded by hundreds of performers)

SONATA FORM (a form built on melodic contrast and tonal development) — Mozart Symphony no. 40 (first movement) — Listening Guide (the time markings are slightly off from the youtube video but you should be able to figure it out)

Homework key: Rhythm transcriptions

Posted in Uncategorized on March 28, 2012 by Jason Lee Oakes

RHYTHM TRANSCRIPTION

Protected: 3/28: Reading and homework; Rhythm and meter

Posted in Uncategorized on March 22, 2012 by Jason Lee Oakes

This content is password protected. To view it please enter your password below:

Protected: Gamelan videos; Hindustani music and raga

Posted in Uncategorized on March 20, 2012 by Jason Lee Oakes

This content is password protected. To view it please enter your password below:

Protected: Reading/Homework: Rhythm and meter

Posted in Uncategorized on March 10, 2012 by Jason Lee Oakes

This content is password protected. To view it please enter your password below:

Protected: 3/7: Quiz and reading

Posted in Uncategorized on March 1, 2012 by Jason Lee Oakes

This content is password protected. To view it please enter your password below: